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Embodied carbon premium for vanity height.jpg (13.27 MB)

Embodied Carbon Premium for Vanity Height

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posted on 2024-05-06, 08:32 authored by James HelalJames Helal

This infographic summarises the key findings from: Helal, J., Trabucco, D., & Savovic, D. (2024). Embodied carbon premium for vanity height: a case for the exclusion of decorative spires in the design of tall buildings. Journal of Cleaner Production, 142334. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2024.142334

This study which investigated the increase in embodied carbon emissions attributable to vanity height in skyscrapers. The study particularly focuses on how decorative spires, often added to buildings to increase their height, contribute to significantly higher embodied greenhouse gas emissions, with effects intensifying as buildings reach taller heights.

The findings underscore the need for a paradigm shift in how architectural achievements are measured and celebrated, advocating for a move away from aesthetics-driven designs towards more environmentally sustainable practices. The study suggests reevaluating current ranking criteria for skyscrapers to discourage the inclusion of vanity height.

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