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ANNA HURLIMANN

Associate Professor in Urban Planning (Built environment and design)

Melbourne, Australia

Anna Hurlimann is an Associate Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Melbourne. She teaches and conducts research on climate change action (adaptation and mitigation) in cities, and environmental aspects of urban planning.

Publications

  • https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=M75gsBoAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao
  • ‘Rethinking the way we practice our professions’: social-ecological resilience for built environment professionals
  • People will drink recycled water - Just keep them in the loop
  • Development control within catchments
  • Recycled water: Perceptions of colour and odour
  • Sustainable urban water management under a changing climate: The role of spatial planning
  • Urban versus regional - How public attitudes to recycled water differ in these contexts
  • University curriculum development - stuck in a process and how to break free
  • Public acceptance and perceptions of alternative water sources: A comparative study in nine locations
  • A local coastal adaptation pathway
  • Barriers to climate change adaptation in the Australian construction industry – Impetus for regulatory reform
  • Drinking water from alternative water sources: Differences in beliefs, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control across eight Australian locations
  • The development of policy pertaining to potable water supply catchment areas in Victoria, Australia
  • Australians' water conservation behaviours and attitudes
  • Barriers to climate change adaption in the Australian property industry
  • Local values and fairness in climate change adaptation: Insights from marginal rural Australian communities
  • Does water context influence behaviour and attitudes to water conservation?
  • Continuing Education for Climate Change: A Study of Australian Urban Planners’ Current Practices and Developing Competence
  • Water experts' perception of risk for new and unfamiliar water projects
  • Conclusion
  • Flood and Fire and Famine
  • Water alternatives-who and what influences public acceptance?
  • Acceptance of water alternatives in Australia – 2009
  • Branding water
  • Accreditation of Australian urban planners: building knowledge and competence
  • Newspaper coverage of water issues in Australia
  • Understanding behaviour to inform water supply management in developed nations – A review of literature, conceptual model and research agenda
  • The effect of information on public acceptance – The case of water from alternative sources
  • Urban planning and sustainable adaptation to sea-level rise
  • Water conservation behavior in Australia
  • Time stories: Making sense of futures in anticipation of sea-level rise
  • Voluntary relocation – An exploration of Australian attitudes in the context of drought, recycled and desalinated water
  • Barriers to implementing water efficiency practices in the built environment: The case of Melbourne and Bendigo, Australia
  • When public opposition defeats alternative water projects – The case of Toowoomba Australia
  • Establishing components of community satisfaction with recycled water use through a structural equation model
  • Water supply in regional Victoria Australia: A review of the water cartage industry and willingness to pay for recycled water
  • What affects public acceptance of recycled and desalinated water?
  • The social values at risk from sea-level rise
  • Responding to environmental challenges: an initial assessment of higher education curricula needs by Australian planning professionals
  • Household use of and satisfaction with alternative water sources in Victoria Australia
  • Towards fair local outcomes in adaptation to sea-level rise
  • Community acceptance of recycled water: can we inoculate the public against scare campaigns?
  • The role of spatial planning in adapting to climate change
  • Corrigendum to “What affects public acceptance of recycled and desalinated water?” [Water Res. 45 (2) (2011) pp. 933–943]
  • Chapter 13 Desalinated Versus Recycled Water: What Does the Public Think?
  • A Plan to Push Limits? Investigating the ecologically sustainable development dimensions of Melbourne's Central Region sustainable water strategy
  • Urban Australians using recycled water for domestic non-potable use—An evaluation of the attributes price, saltiness, colour and odour using conjoint analysis
  • Local values for fairer adaptation to sea-level rise: A typology of residents and their lived values in Lakes Entrance, Australia
  • Is the Australian construction industry prepared for climate change?
  • Is climate change in the curriculum? An analysis of Australian urban planning degrees
  • Climate change transformation: A definition and typology to guide decision making in urban environments
  • Attitudes to reclaimed water for domestic use: Part 2. Trust
  • Pricing of drinking water VS recycled water: Fairness and satisfaction
  • Contingent valuation by the community of indirect benefits of using recycled water: An Australian case study
  • Attitudes to reclaimed water for domestic use: Part 1. Age
  • Charting a new course for water-is black water reuse sustainable?
  • What attributes of recycled water make it fit for residential purposes? The Mawson Lakes experience
  • Attitudes to future use of recycled water in a Bendigo office building
  • Time for a Water Re-‘Vision’
  • Water, Water, Everywhere—Which Drop Should be Drunk?
  • Is recycled water use risky? An Urban Australian community’s perspective
  • Time for a Water Re-‘Vision’
  • Transforming the agency and influence of landscape architects in climate change actions: An empirical analysis of barriers and facilitators
  • Towards the transformation of cities: A built environment process map to identify the role of key sectors and actors in producing the built environment across life stages
  • Delivery or desirability of benefits? Predicting the effectiveness of egoistic and altruistic message appeals for recycled water use
  • Climate change preparedness across sectors of the built environment – A review of literature
  • Local values and fairness in climate change adaptation
  • Climate Change and Risk to Real Estate
  • Advancing capacity to adapt to climate change: addressing information needs in the Australian property industry
  • Climate change frontrunners in the Australian property sector
  • Urban planning policy must do more to integrate climate change adaptation and mitigation actions
  • Communicating About Water Security Under a Changing Climate
  • Framing sustainable urban water management: A critical analysis of theory and practice
  • Barriers to and facilitators of climate change action in architecture practice
  • Better policy to support climate change action in the built environment: A framework to analyse and design a policy portfolio
  • Climate change transformation in built environments – A policy instrument framework

ANNA HURLIMANN's public data